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Geodon Sexual Side Effects - Precautions and Warnings With Asenapine

This page contains links to eMedTV Bipolar Disorder Articles containing information on subjects from Geodon Sexual Side Effects to Precautions and Warnings With Asenapine. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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  • Geodon Sexual Side Effects
    Sexual side effects (such as ejaculation problems or impotence) may occur with the use of Geodon. This eMedTV Web page further discusses Geodon sexual side effects and describes what your doctor may recommend if they do occur.
  • Geodon Side Effects
    Some of the most common Geodon side effects include drowsiness, headaches, and weight gain. This eMedTV Web page describes other common side effects of Geodon and also lists serious problems that should be reported to a doctor (such as anxiety).
  • Geodon Substitute
    Many drugs can be used as a Geodon substitute, including other antipsychotics and mood stabilizers. This eMedTV segment describes various alternatives to Geodon and explains how psychosocial treatments can also be helpful.
  • Geodon Tab
    Geodon comes in capsule form; there is no Geodon tab available. This portion of the eMedTV archives explains what forms and strengths are available for this medicine and offers dosing guidelines for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.
  • Geodon Tablets
    There are no Geodon tablets; the medication is only available in capsule form. As this page from the eMedTV site explains, an injectable form of Geodon is also available and is approved to treat agitation associated with schizophrenia.
  • Geodon Uses
    This eMedTV article explains that while Geodon is used mainly to treat bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, there are also some off-label Geodon uses (such as the treatment of Tourette syndrome or behavior problems in elderly people with dementia).
  • Geodon Warnings and Precautions
    Priapism is a rare but possible side effect of Geodon. As this eMedTV segment explains, there are many important Geodon warnings and precautions to be aware of, including other possible side effects that can occur in some people who take the drug.
  • Geodon Weight Change
    During treatment with Geodon, weight change could occur as a side effect. This section of the eMedTV archives explains how common this side effect appears to be and discusses the potential dangers of excessive weight gain.
  • Geodon Withdraw
    If you abruptly stop taking Geodon, withdrawal symptoms could occur. This eMedTV page lists potential withdrawal symptoms and explains how your doctor can help prevent these symptoms. Geodon withdraw is a common misspelling of Geodon withdrawal.
  • Geodon Withdrawal
    As this eMedTV article explains, Geodon withdrawal symptoms can include insomnia, symptoms of schizophrenia, and symptoms of bipolar disorder. This page describes the steps your doctor may take to prevent withdrawals from Geodon.
  • Geodon Withdrawal Symptoms
    Potential Geodon withdrawal symptoms include hallucinations, insomnia, and depression. This eMedTV Web page lists other possible withdrawal symptoms and explains what your doctor can do to help prevent severe symptoms from occurring.
  • Geodone
    Geodon is a prescription drug used to treat bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. This eMedTV article explores Geodon effects, dosing guidelines, and possible side effects -- and also links to more information. Geodone is a common misspelling of Geodon.
  • How Does Abilify Work?
    Many people wonder, "How does Abilify work?" As this eMedTV page explains, the drug is known to block or lessen the effects of certain chemicals in the brain. This article takes a closer look at Abilify, including what it is used for and how it may work.
  • How Does Depakote Work?
    Depakote works by increasing the amount of gamma-aminobutyric acid (a certain chemical) in the brain. This eMedTV segment briefly explains what this medication is used for and offers more details on how Depakote works.
  • How Does Geodon Work?
    Many people wonder how Geodon works. As this eMedTV page explains, it is not entirely clear how the drug works for the treatment of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. However, it is known that the drug blocks the effects of certain brain chemicals.
  • How Does Lithium Work?
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, it's not exactly clear how lithium works. It appears to affect certain chemicals in the brain called neurotransmitters, which could explain its effectiveness in treating bipolar disorder.
  • How Does Seroquel Work?
    You may be wondering, "How does Seroquel work?" As this eMedTV page explains, it is not clear exactly how Seroquel works for schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. However, it is known that it blocks or lessens the effects of several chemicals in the brain.
  • Information on Eskalith
    Need information on Eskalith? This eMedTV resource is a great place to start. It covers what this drug is used for, dosing instructions, and safety considerations to discuss with your doctor, with a link to a full-length article on this topic.
  • Lamotrigene
    A prescription drug, lamotrigine is licensed to treat bipolar disorder and epilepsy. This eMedTV selection offers a brief overview of the medication and provides a link to more information. Lamotrigene is a common misspelling of lamotrigine.
  • Lamotrigin
    As this eMedTV Web segment explains, a doctor may prescribe lamotrigine to treat bipolar disorder or epilepsy. This page also explains how lamotrigine works and describes possible side effects. Lamotrigin is a common misspelling of lamotrigine.
  • Lamotrigine
    Lamotrigine is a drug that is used to treat epilepsy and bipolar disorder. This selection from the eMedTV Web site offers an in-depth look at this drug, providing information on its dosing, possible side effects, overdose symptoms, and more.
  • Lamotrigine Dosing
    Lamotrigine dosing is very complicated, as this eMedTV article explains. This resource offers detailed information on how your healthcare provider will determine your lamotrigine dose, and also offers tips on when and how to take the medication.
  • Lamotrigine for Bipolar Disorder
    As this eMedTV page explains, lamotrigine is just one of the many products available for bipolar disorder. This page takes a brief look at this use, explains the drug's limitations in this regard, and offers a link to more information on its indications.
  • Lamotrigine Side Effects
    Common side effects of lamotrigine include nausea, dizziness, and headaches. This eMedTV resource discusses these side effects in more detail, including statistics on how often they occur and side effects requiring immediate medical attention.
  • Liquid Lithium
    The usual starting lithium dose is 600 mg three times daily (for liquid lithium, tablets, and capsules). This eMedTV page also offers dosing guidelines for extended-release tablets and explains how dosing works for maintenance treatment.
  • Litheum
    This page on the eMedTV Web site gives an overview of lithium, a prescription drug used to treat bipolar disorder. This page describes how it works, tips on taking the drug, and dosing information. Litheum is a common misspelling of lithium.
  • Lithiam
    This eMedTV resource offers an overview of lithium, a prescription medication used to treat bipolar disorder. This page also covers some general precautions to be aware of before using the medication. Lithiam is a common misspelling of lithium.
  • Lithium
    Lithium is a prescription drug approved to help control symptoms of bipolar disorder. This page on the eMedTV Web site provides a detailed overview of the drug, including how it works, possible side effects, and tips on when and how to take it.
  • Lithium 150 mg
    Lithium comes in several strengths and forms; lithium 150 mg capsules are the lowest available strength. This eMedTV resource lists the other available strengths and offers dosing guidelines for the treatment of acute mania and maintenance treatment.
  • Lithium 300 mg
    Lithium comes in various forms and strengths, such as lithium 300 mg capsules. This eMedTV resource lists other available lithium strengths and provides dosing guidelines for the treatment of acute mania.
  • Lithium 450 mg
    There are currently two strengths available for extended-release lithium: 450 mg and 300 mg tablets. This eMedTV article provides dosing guidelines for the treatment of acute mania and for maintenance treatment (to prevent future bipolar symptoms).
  • Lithium 600 mg
    The recommended starting lithium dosage for treating acute mania is lithium 600 mg three times daily. This eMedTV Web page explains how dosing works for extended-release lithium tablets and offers dosing guidelines for maintenance treatment.
  • Lithium and Breastfeeding
    Because lithium passes through breast milk, it may not be safe to take the drug when breastfeeding. This eMedTV page explains what to do if you are taking lithium and breastfeeding at the same time, including what to watch for in your nursing child.
  • Lithium and Dry Mouth
    There are several side effects of lithium, and dry mouth appears to be one of them. This page of the eMedTV library offers some suggestions that may offer relief, such as sipping water or sugarless drinks often and avoiding caffeine and alcohol.
  • Lithium and Hair Loss
    Hair loss is a possible side effect of lithium. This selection from the eMedTV Web site explains why it's difficult to determine if hair loss is due to lithium or other factors and describes what to do if you are taking lithium and hair loss occurs.
  • Lithium and Pregnancy
    It is generally considered unsafe to take lithium during pregnancy. This page on the eMedTV Web site explains how animal and human studies on lithium and pregnancy showed that the drug increases the risk of birth defects (specifically heart defects).
  • Lithium Capsules
    There are currently four different forms of lithium: capsules, tablets, extended-release tablets, and syrup. This eMedTV page offers general dosing information for lithium and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using this drug.
  • Lithium Carbonate Drug Information
    People with bipolar disorder may benefit from taking a prescription drug called lithium carbonate. This eMedTV page tells you what you need to know about this product, including safety warnings and the specific type of bipolar episode it can treat.
  • Lithium Dangers
    People taking lithium who have kidney disease or heart disease are at a high risk for lithium toxicity. This eMedTV segment explores other potential lithium dangers and lists common signs and symptoms that may indicate lithium toxicity.
  • Lithium Dosage
    The recommended starting lithium dosage will depend on several factors, which this eMedTV article describes. This page also provides the typical starting dosages for acute mania and maintenance treatment, as well as tips for taking the medication.
  • Lithium Drug Information
    Lithium is a prescription drug approved to control symptoms of bipolar disorder and help prevent relapses. This eMedTV segment contains more lithium drug information and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using this medication.
  • Lithium Drug Interactions
    Drug interactions can occur when lithium is combined with other medicines, such as diuretics and ARBs. This eMedTV segment lists other medicines that can cause lithium drug interactions and explains the negative consequences that may result.
  • Lithium Drug Side Effects
    Most side effects of the drug lithium are actually signs of lithium toxicity. This segment from the eMedTV site lists some of the signs of mild to moderate toxicity and explains how your doctor may diagnose and treat this potentially serious problem.
  • Lithium for Bipolar Disorder
    Many healthcare providers will prescribe the drug lithium for bipolar disorder, to treat manic episodes. This eMedTV article explores how lithium works to control symptoms of bipolar disorder and discusses the use of this medication in children.
  • Lithium Indications
    Lithium is a prescription medicine used for treating symptoms of bipolar disorder and preventing relapses. This eMedTV segment discusses lithium indications in more detail and includes a list of possible off-label uses for this medication.
  • Lithium Medication
    This eMedTV article talks about lithium, a medication that is used to treat bipolar disorder and to prevent manic episodes. This page explores how lithium may work, describes the effects of this medicine, and offers general warnings and precautions.
  • Lithium Medicine
    As explained in the eMedTV segment, lithium is a medicine approved for treating bipolar disorder (manic episodes, in particular). This article explores the other effects of lithium and discusses the use of this medicine in children.
  • Lithium Oral
    As this eMedTV article explains, lithium is an oral medication commonly used for the treatment of bipolar disorder. This resource offers general dosing information for lithium, explains how the drug works, and lists potential side effects.
  • Lithium Overdose
    If too much lithium is taken, vomiting, blurred vision, or seizures may result. This eMedTV Web page provides additional symptoms of a lithium overdose and explains how an overdose may be treated (such as with dialysis or pumping the stomach).
  • Lithium Pill Information
    If you have bipolar disorder, your doctor may prescribe lithium to help treat manic episodes. This eMedTV health channel provides more lithium pill information, including important warnings and precautions for the prescription medication.
  • Lithium Risks
    It is possible to develop lithium toxicity while taking lithium medications. This section of the eMedTV library explores other lithium risks and also explains what side effects may occur with this drug (and which ones are signs of lithium toxicity).
  • Lithium Safety
    You should talk to your doctor before taking lithium if you have heart disease or liver disease. This eMedTV article contains more lithium safety information, including warnings and precautions concerning the drug and a list of potential side effects.
  • Lithium Side Affects
    Common side effects of lithium include coordination problems, blurred vision, and shakiness. This eMedTV page explains how side effects of the drug usually indicate lithium toxicity. Lithium side affects is a common misspelling of lithium side effects.
  • Lithium Side Effects
    Contact your doctor if you have side effects while taking lithium -- side effects could indicate toxicity. This eMedTV article offers a list of possible side effects and explains what your healthcare provider will do if they occur.
  • Lithium Substitute
    You may want to consider a lithium substitute if you experience any side effects while using this drug. As this eMedTV page explains, medications that are commonly used for treating bipolar disorder include other "mood-stabilizers" and antipsychotics.
  • Lithium Tablets
    There are several different forms of lithium: tablets, capsules, extended-release tablets, and a syrup. This eMedTV article explains what lithium products are used for, describes how the drug works, and lists some of its potential side effects.
  • Lithium Toxicity
    Toxicity is common in people taking lithium because the effective dose is close to the toxic dose. This eMedTV resource explains how lithium toxicity is determined and describes some symptoms to watch out for.
  • Learn About Lithium Uses
    Although it is not a cure for bipolar disorder, lithium can help control the symptoms of the condition. This eMedTV resource provides detailed information on how the drug works, its use in children, and a list of several off-label uses for lithium.
  • Lithium Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV Web page describes several lithium warnings and precautions people should be aware of prior to taking it. This page explains what to tell your doctor before starting lithium and provides a list of those who should avoid the drug.
  • Lithobid
    Lithobid is a medicine that can be prescribed to treat bipolar disorder (also known as manic depression). This eMedTV Web page provides an overview of the drug, explaining how it works, potential side effects, and general dosing guidelines.
  • Lithobid Drug Information
    As explained in this eMedTV article, Lithobid is a medication approved to treat bipolar disorder. This Web page takes a closer look at this drug, with information on side effects, what to discuss with your healthcare provider, and more.
  • Lithuim
    Lithium is approved for treating bipolar disorder and works by affecting certain brain chemicals. This eMedTV resource describes lithium in more detail and offers general precautions for taking the drug. Lithuim is a common misspelling of lithium.
  • Lithuim Carbonate
    Lithium is often prescribed to treat bipolar disorder. This portion of the eMedTV library explores some potential side effects of the drug and offers general dosing information. Lithuim carbonate is a common misspelling and variation of lithium.
  • Lithum
    Lithium is a prescription drug that is used to treat bipolar disorder. This eMedTV page offers an overview of how the drug works and possible side effects. It also provides a link to more information. Lithum is a common misspelling of lithium.
  • Lythium
    This eMedTV resource explains that lithium is a prescription drug that controls bipolar disorder symptoms by affecting certain brain chemicals. This page also covers the factors that may affect your dosage. Lythium is a common misspelling of lithium.
  • Medications for Bipolar Disorder
    There are several bipolar disorder medications available, each with its advantages and disadvantages. This eMedTV segment describes the different types of medications currently available and explains situations in which each one might be used.
  • Negative Effects of Abilify
    Abilify can cause an increase in blood sugar levels, which may lead to diabetes. This segment from the eMedTV library explores the other negative effects of Abilify and includes a list of side effects that have been reported with this medication.
  • Negative Effects of Depakote
    In a number of cases, negative effects of Depakote (such as hair loss or diarrhea) have been reported. This eMedTV segment lists some of the other side effects that were reported with Depakote, including rare but potentially serious complications.
  • Negative Effects of Geodon
    Geodon can cause an increase in blood sugar levels, which could increase the risk of diabetes. This eMedTV resource explores other potentially negative effects of Geodon and lists some of the potential side effects of this medication.
  • Negative Effects of Lithium
    People taking lithium who have low sodium levels in their blood are at a higher risk for lithium toxicity. This eMedTV segment covers other potentially negative effects of lithium and lists certain side effects that may be signs of lithium toxicity.
  • Negative Effects of Seroquel
    Seroquel may increase the risk of seizures in some people. As this eMedTV page explains, there are many other negative effects of Seroquel that you should be aware of before starting treatment, including potentially serious side effects of the drug.
  • Olanzapine (Zyprexa)
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV site, olanzapine (Zyprexa) is approved to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. This article takes a quick look at this medication and includes a link to more in-depth information.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Asenapine
    People with dementia should avoid asenapine. Precautions and warnings related to the drug are provided in this eMedTV article, including important safety concerns to be aware of during treatment and what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
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