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Generic Geodon - Geodon Safety

This page contains links to eMedTV Bipolar Disorder Articles containing information on subjects from Generic Geodon to Geodon Safety. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Generic Geodon
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, some forms of Geodon (ziprasidone) are available as generics. This article talks about how the generic versions compare to the brand-name drug and lists the strengths in which the generics are available.
  • Generic Lithium
    This selection from the eMedTV Web site explains the various forms and strengths of generic lithium that are currently available. This article also explains why many companies no longer make the brand-name version of lithium.
  • Generic Lithobid
    As all of the patents for Lithobid have expired, there is a generic version of the medication available. This eMedTV segment also explains how the FDA has assigned generic Lithobid with an "AB" rating, meaning it is equivalent to the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Seroquel
    This eMedTV resource provides a discussion on generic Seroquel (quetiapine), with information on how the generic versions compare to brand-name Seroquel. Details are also given on the available strengths of the generic version.
  • Generic Symbyax
    As explained in this selection from the eMedTV Web site, generic Symbyax (olanzapine and fluoxetine) is now available. This article looks at who makes the generic versions, how they compare to the brand-name drug, and more.
  • Geodan
    Geodon is a prescription drug used for the treatment of bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. This eMedTV page describes the effects of the drug, explains how it works, and lists factors that can affect your dosage. Geodan is a common misspelling of Geodon.
  • Geoden
    Geodon is a prescription medication licensed to treat bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. This eMedTV Web article describes Geodon in more detail and offers some general precautions for taking the drug. Geoden is a common misspelling of Geodon.
  • Geodin
    Geodon is a medication that is licensed for treating schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. This eMedTV resource offers a general overview of Geodon and links to more detailed information. Geodin is a common misspelling of Geodon.
  • Geodon
    Geodon is a medicine that can be prescribed to treat schizophrenia or bipolar disorder in adults. This eMedTV Web page provides an overview of Geodon uses, effects, general dosing guidelines, and potential side effects.
  • Geodon 20 mg Capsules
    People being treated for schizophrenia usually start with Geodon 20 mg capsules (one capsule, twice a day). This eMedTV page also offers Geodon dosing guidelines for treating bipolar disorder and lists the other strengths available for this medicine.
  • Geodon 40 mg Capsules
    For the treatment of bipolar disorder, most people start with Geodon 40 mg capsules. This section of the eMedTV library provides more detailed Geodon dosing information, including dosing guidelines for the treatment of schizophrenia.
  • Geodon 60 mg Capsules
    Most people with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder start on a low Geodon dose. As this eMedTV page explains, however, your doctor may increase your dose to Geodon 60 mg capsules or 80 mg capsules if necessary to control your symptoms.
  • Geodon 80 mg Capsules
    Although most people start with a low Geodon dosage, your doctor may increase your dose if needed. As this eMedTV resource explains, Geodon 80 mg capsules are the highest recommended strength (one capsule, twice a day).
  • Geodon Alternatives
    Therapy and other medications can be used as Geodon alternatives. This eMedTV page provides a list of medication alternatives to Geodon (such as typical antipsychotics and mood stabilizers) and discusses how therapy can be used as a Geodon alternative.
  • Geodon and Breastfeeding
    It is not known whether Geodon is passed through breast milk during breastfeeding. This eMedTV segment explores Geodon and breastfeeding in detail, noting in particular why it's important to talk to your doctor about your particular situation.
  • Geodon and Diabetes
    Taking Geodon may increase your risk of developing diabetes or worsen preexisting diabetes. This eMedTV article offers more information on Geodon and diabetes, including an explanation of why the medication may cause the condition.
  • Geodon and Dry Mouth
    It is possible to experience a dry mouth while taking Geodon. This article from the eMedTV Web site offers more information on Geodon and dry mouth, and provides a list of suggestions for dry mouth relief (such as using a humidifier at night).
  • Geodon and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV page explains, the FDA classifies Geodon as a pregnancy Category C drug -- meaning that a pregnant woman may take it if its benefits outweigh any possible risks to her fetus. If you're on Geodon and pregnancy occurs, tell your doctor.
  • Geodon and Sex Drive
    Geodon may cause certain sexual side effects, such as impotence and ejaculation problems. This eMedTV resource offers more information on Geodon and sex drive, and explains how common these sexual side effects are with people taking the drug.
  • Geodon and Weight Gain
    Up to 10 percent of people who take Geodon experience weight gain. This eMedTV segment discusses Geodon and weight in more detail and offers some tips on how to deal with small, unexplained weight gain (such as eating heart-healthy foods).
  • Geodon Antipsychotic Medicine
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Geodon is an antipsychotic medicine used for treating schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. This page describes the effects of Geodon and explores possible "off-label" uses for this medication.
  • Geodon Capsules
    Geodon is an atypical antipsychotic medication used for treating schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. As this eMedTV article explains, Geodon capsules are available by prescription only and are taken by mouth, typically twice a day.
  • Geodon Dangers
    Geodon can cause a life-threatening irregular heart rhythm (arrhythmia) called QT prolongation. This eMedTV segment explores other potential Geodon dangers and explains what side effects could potentially occur with this medication.
  • Geodon Dosage
    The recommended starting Geodon dosage for the treatment of schizophrenia is 20 mg twice a day. This part of the eMedTV library also offers Geodon dosing guidelines for the treatment of bipolar disorder, as well as some general tips on taking the drug.
  • Geodon Drug Information
    Geodon is a prescription antipsychotic medication approved to treat bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. This eMedTV Web page offers more Geodon drug information, including warnings, precautions, and side effects associated with the medicine.
  • Geodon Drug Interactions
    When drugs like carbamazepine or cisapride are taken with Geodon, drug interactions can potentially occur. This eMedTV page lists other drugs that may lead to Geodon interactions and explains the possible effects of combining these drugs with Geodon.
  • Geodon Drug Side Effects
    Common side effects of Geodon may include nausea, drowsiness, and headaches. This eMedTV article lists other Geodon drug side effects, including rare but possible side effects and potentially serious problems that require medical attention.
  • Geodon for Bipolar Disorder
    Healthcare providers often prescribe the antipsychotic medication Geodon for bipolar disorder treatment. This eMedTV resource describes bipolar disorder in more detail and explains how Geodon works to improve symptoms of the mental illness.
  • Geodon for Children
    Healthcare providers will generally not prescribe Geodon for children. As this article from the eMedTV Web site explains, the medication has not been approved to treat bipolar disorder in children or childhood schizophrenia.
  • Geodon for Schizophrenia
    Doctors often prescribe the medication Geodon for schizophrenia to help improve symptoms. This page from the eMedTV Web site defines schizophrenia and describes the effects that Geodon may have on people with this mental illness.
  • Geodon Indications
    Geodon is a prescription medication commonly used for treating schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. This eMedTV resource discusses Geodon indications in more detail and lists examples of possible off-label uses for the medication.
  • Geodon Medication
    Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia can be treated with Geodon, an antipsychotic medication. This eMedTV segment gives a brief overview of how to take this drug and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Geodon Oral
    Geodon is a medication commonly used for the treatment of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. As this eMedTV segment explains, the drug comes in capsule form and is available by prescription. Geodon oral capsules are typically taken twice a day.
  • Geodon Overdose
    Symptoms of a Geodon overdose can include slurred speech, high blood pressure, and anxiety. This eMedTV Web page describes other signs of a Geodon overdose and explains how a healthcare provider may treat an overdose on Geodon.
  • Geodon Risks
    Geodon could cause tardive dyskinesia, a condition involving uncontrollable body or face movements. This eMedTV article discusses other potential Geodon risks and includes a list of the common side effects that have been reported with this drug.
  • Geodon Safety
    Before starting Geodon, you should talk to your doctor if you have liver or kidney disease. This eMedTV segment contains more Geodon safety information, including a list of potential side effects of the drug and other warnings and precautions.
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